class QMouseEvent#

The QMouseEvent class contains parameters that describe a mouse event. More

Inheritance diagram of PySide6.QtGui.QMouseEvent

Synopsis#

Methods#

Note

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Detailed Description#

Mouse events occur when a mouse button is pressed or released inside a widget, or when the mouse cursor is moved.

Mouse move events will occur only when a mouse button is pressed down, unless mouse tracking has been enabled with QWidget::setMouseTracking().

Qt automatically grabs the mouse when a mouse button is pressed inside a widget; the widget will continue to receive mouse events until the last mouse button is released.

A mouse event contains a special accept flag that indicates whether the receiver wants the event. You should call ignore() if the mouse event is not handled by your widget. A mouse event is propagated up the parent widget chain until a widget accepts it with accept(), or an event filter consumes it.

Note

If a mouse event is propagated to a widget for which Qt::WA_NoMousePropagation has been set, that mouse event will not be propagated further up the parent widget chain.

The state of the keyboard modifier keys can be found by calling the modifiers() function, inherited from QInputEvent .

The position() function gives the cursor position relative to the widget or item that receives the mouse event. If you move the widget as a result of the mouse event, use the global position returned by globalPosition() to avoid a shaking motion.

The QWidget::setEnabled() function can be used to enable or disable mouse and keyboard events for a widget.

Reimplement the QWidget event handlers, QWidget::mousePressEvent(), QWidget::mouseReleaseEvent(), QWidget::mouseDoubleClickEvent(), and QWidget::mouseMoveEvent() to receive mouse events in your own widgets.

See also

pos()

__init__(arg__1)#
Parameters:

arg__1QMouseEvent

__init__(type, localPos, button, buttons, modifiers[, device=QPointingDevice.primaryPointingDevice()])
Parameters:

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use another constructor instead (global position is required).

Constructs a mouse event object originating from device.

The type parameter must be one of QEvent::MouseButtonPress, QEvent::MouseButtonRelease, QEvent::MouseButtonDblClick, or QEvent::MouseMove.

The localPos is the mouse cursor’s position relative to the receiving widget or item. The window position is set to the same value as localPos. The button that caused the event is given as a value from the Qt::MouseButton enum. If the event type is MouseMove, the appropriate button for this event is Qt::NoButton. The mouse and keyboard states at the time of the event are specified by buttons and modifiers.

The globalPosition() is initialized to pos() , which may not be appropriate. Use the other constructor to specify the global position explicitly.

__init__(type, localPos, globalPos, button, buttons, modifiers[, device=QPointingDevice.primaryPointingDevice()])
Parameters:

Constructs a mouse event object originating from device.

The type parameter must be QEvent::MouseButtonPress, QEvent::MouseButtonRelease, QEvent::MouseButtonDblClick, or QEvent::MouseMove.

The localPos is the mouse cursor’s position relative to the receiving widget or item. The cursor’s position in screen coordinates is specified by globalPos. The window position is set to the same value as localPos. The button that caused the event is given as a value from the Qt::MouseButton enum. If the event type is MouseMove, the appropriate button for this event is Qt::NoButton. buttons is the state of all buttons at the time of the event, modifiers the state of all keyboard modifiers.

__init__(type, localPos, scenePos, globalPos, button, buttons, modifiers[, device=QPointingDevice.primaryPointingDevice()])
Parameters:

Constructs a mouse event object.

The type parameter must be QEvent::MouseButtonPress, QEvent::MouseButtonRelease, QEvent::MouseButtonDblClick, or QEvent::MouseMove.

The points localPos, scenePos and globalPos specify the mouse cursor’s position relative to the receiving widget or item, window, and screen or desktop, respectively.

The button that caused the event is given as a value from the Qt::MouseButton enum. If the event type is MouseMove, the appropriate button for this event is Qt::NoButton. buttons is the state of all buttons at the time of the event, modifiers is the state of all keyboard modifiers.

__init__(type, localPos, scenePos, globalPos, button, buttons, modifiers, source[, device=QPointingDevice.primaryPointingDevice()])
Parameters:
__repr__()#
Return type:

object

flags()#
Return type:

Combination of MouseEventFlag

Returns the mouse event flags.

The mouse event flags provide additional information about a mouse event.

See also

flags()

globalPos()#
Return type:

QPoint

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use globalPosition() .toPoint() instead.

Returns the global position of the mouse cursor at the time of the event. This is important on asynchronous window systems like X11. Whenever you move your widgets around in response to mouse events, globalPos() may differ a lot from the current pointer position pos() , and from QWidget::mapToGlobal( pos() ).

See also

globalX() globalY()

globalX()#
Return type:

int

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use globalPosition() . x() instead.

Returns the global x position of the mouse cursor at the time of the event.

globalY()#
Return type:

int

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use globalPosition() . y() instead.

Returns the global y position of the mouse cursor at the time of the event.

localPos()#
Return type:

QPointF

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use position() instead.

Returns the position of the mouse cursor as a QPointF, relative to the widget or item that received the event.

If you move the widget as a result of the mouse event, use the screen position returned by screenPos() to avoid a shaking motion.

pos()#
Return type:

QPoint

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use position() instead.

Returns the position of the mouse cursor, relative to the widget that received the event.

If you move the widget as a result of the mouse event, use the global position returned by globalPos() to avoid a shaking motion.

See also

x() y() globalPos()

screenPos()#
Return type:

QPointF

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use globalPosition() instead.

Returns the position of the mouse cursor as a QPointF, relative to the screen that received the event.

source()#
Return type:

MouseEventSource

Use pointingDevice() instead.

Returns information about the mouse event source.

The mouse event source can be used to distinguish between genuine and artificial mouse events. The latter are events that are synthesized from touch events by the operating system or Qt itself. This enum tells you from where it was synthesized; but often it’s more useful to know from which device it was synthesized, so try to use pointingDevice() instead.

Note

Many platforms provide no such information. On such platforms Qt::MouseEventNotSynthesized is returned always.

Note

In Qt 5-based code, source() was often used to attempt to distinguish mouse events from an actual mouse vs. those that were synthesized because some legacy QQuickItem or QWidget subclass did not react to a QTouchEvent . However, you could not tell whether it was synthesized from a QTouchEvent or a QTabletEvent , and other information was lost. pointingDevice() tells you the specific device that it came from, so you might check pointingDevice()->type() or pointingDevice()->capabilities() to decide how to react to this event. But it’s even better to react to the original event rather than handling only mouse events.

See also

source()

windowPos()#
Return type:

QPointF

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use scenePosition() instead.

Returns the position of the mouse cursor as a QPointF, relative to the window that received the event.

If you move the widget as a result of the mouse event, use the global position returned by globalPos() to avoid a shaking motion.

x()#
Return type:

int

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use position() .x() instead.

Returns the x position of the mouse cursor, relative to the widget that received the event.

See also

y() pos()

y()#
Return type:

int

Note

This function is deprecated.

Use position() .y() instead.

Returns the y position of the mouse cursor, relative to the widget that received the event.

See also

x() pos()